The Final Silence

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Review #19: Fiction

The Final Silence by Stuart Neville

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*I received this book as an advanced readers copy at the Book Expo America in New York City in May, 2014. The hardcover goes on sale October 28th, 2014.

The newest novel from award winning crime/thriller writer Stuart Neville is a roller coaster of gruesome murders and deadly secrets. This is the fourth installment of his Belfast novels, revolving around now disgraced investigator Jack Lennon.

Rea Carlisle, whose father is a prominent politician, inherits her uncle house after her mother’s brother dies. While cleaning out the house, Rea comes across an upstairs bedroom that is locked. After prying the door open with a crowbar, Rea discovers a secret book. The contents of the book describe several grisly murders; journal entries about committing the crimes, newspaper articles, and even hair clippings and fingernails of the victims.

Rea wants to take the book to the police immediately, however, her father (thinking of his political aspirations) wants to keep the whole thing quiet. Not knowing what to do, and not wanting to keep the book and the crimes a secret, Rea reaches out to an old friend — Jack Lennon. Since Jack is not currently working on the police force, he can’t do much other than look into Rea’s suspicions. But after the book goes missing and another horrible murder is committed, the Belfast police become fully involved.

DCI Serena Flanagan takes the case and, in a sense, (secretly) teams up with Lennon to track down the book, and the killer, before more murders pile up.

The plot moves at breakneck speed, with lots of secrets, lots of lies, and, well, lots of murders, both in the past and the present. Neville sets up an intricate web of good guys, bad guys, and every type of person in between. There are a few twists, and a handful of quick shocks that keep the story moving, and the pressure on DCI Flanagan and Lennon to find the incriminating book, catch the killer, and, in a way, begin to clean up Lennon’s heavily tarnished reputation.

Neville creates deep, flawed, real characters that move this story along just as smoothly as the actions do. Each has a very unique voice, and detailed and specific view of the world and the events that take place, and are genuine in their personalities.

With these characters and the action-packed and chilling plot, Neville does not disappoint old or new fans.

Though this novel stands completely on it’s own, and does a good job of integrating any relevant background information on Lennon and his career and relationship with his daughter and deceased wife’s family, I found my lack of complete understanding of Jack’s history a little annoying. There is a lot of mention of past events dealing with Jack’s police work, his wife and family life, and trauma in his life and his daughter;s that, though ultimately holding no real bearing on the plot, disconnected me from Lennon as a character because I didn’t know the full story. This is not a detriment to the book or Neville’s writing; anything really important was fleshed out, but I was always wanting more information. Whenever something from the past came up, I wished I was being reminded of information I already knew rather than hearing about it for the first time. So, my only issue with reading this novel is that it was my first Lennon book but the fourth in Neville’s Lennon collection. I would suggest anyone interested in this title and Jack Lennon’s story start with Collusion or it’s prequel The Ghosts of Belfast (where Jack is introduced as a minor character).

Basically Neville writes a fast-paced thrilling murder mystery that incorporates a collection of flawed (though in most cases well-intentioned) characters that sends shivers down your spine from the shear twistedness of the crimes.

My rating: 4 out of 5 stars.

*cover art from Amazon.com

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